Interview with Warren Lewis Allen

Hailing from North Hollywood, California, Warren Lewis Allen brings us Radio Road, an original take on a pre-apocyliptic event during which four friends prepare for the death of the Earth. Below you can read more about Warren Lewis Allen and his work.

What is your connection to the South?

I moved to Nashville, Tennessee at the beginning of 2010 after I flipped a penny against Tampa, Florida, which was tails. The coin landed on tails and I chose Nashville anyway because Florida really scares me in an arcane, Tropicana orange juice sort of way. Nashville is just an arm of the American South so it is difficult for me to speak about my relationship to the entire region; however, Middle Tennessee has a very transcendental energy about it that stuck honey to my bones and cemented who I am as an artist today. There are magnificently creative people there in Nashville who are willing to collaborate on things other than music, though there is plenty of that. There is always somebody receptive to discussions that peel on and on and sort of ash away into little butterflies of tail end thought. I’ve never had these sort of conversations or relationships anywhere else.

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Interview with Caitlyn Greene

Caitlyn Greene creates an engaging world for her audience with Augusta tale of deception and love deep in the swamplands. You can read more about the filmmaker from the Big Apple below.

What is your connection to the South?

I was born and raised in North Carolina.

Where did you get your inspiration for this work?

The short answer: Delaney Nolan’s essay, “How I Gonna Bare My Neck Outside in the Sweat-Scared Morning,” on which the film is based.

The longer answer: My mom’s side of the family is from rural Louisiana, so I grew up intrigued by a place I constantly heard stories about but had never really known. When I read Delaney’s essay, it struck a deep chord. Written while she was living in New Orleans, the story was full of the feeling that pulled me to Louisiana. Not to mention I loved the essay and Delaney’s writing apart from my interest in the place.

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Interview with Dust Of The Ground

Dust Of The Ground is a local group of directors responsible for the inspiring short My Bones are Singing, read bellow to find out more about these Columbia filmmakers.

What is your connection to the South?

We work and live in Columbia, SC and are honored to call it our home.

Where did you get your inspiration for this work?

We have been friends with Aaron, his family and Those Lavender Whales for several years now. When we found out he had been diagnosed with brain cancer, it was pretty devastating not just for us, but for a lot of Columbia. The way in which the city rallied behind Aaron and the positivity he continues to exude throughout his treatment and recovery has been a special thing to witness.

When we found out he was recording a new album, we knew it would be a powerful collection of songs so we asked him if we could make a short documentary about his experience and how it influenced his aptly-titled, “My Bones Are Singing.”

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Interview with Tijah Bumgarner

What is your connection to the South?

I was born and raised in a small West Virginia town. After leaving the state for quite some time, I came back because I realized the need for positive and powerful storytelling that needed to be done here. I have committed myself to studying the region’s history and present while making work I hope will add to the greater conversation of this place.

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